EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AUTOIMMUNE CHRONIC THYROIDITIS IN A GROUP OF ADULTS WITH THYROID DISEASES AND DIABETES MELLITUS AND OTHER CHANGES IN GLYCEMIC BALANCE

Gherbon Adriana

Abstract


Background&Aims: Autoimmune chronic thyroiditis (ACT) is frequently associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of ACT in a group of adults with DM and other changes in glycemic balance. Methods: The studied group was of 650 people with DM and other changes in glycemic balance, aged between 18 - 79 years. The methods of investigation were represented by clinical, imaging, biochemical, hormonal and immunological parameters. Results: The prevalence of ACT in the study group was 32% (33.33% F and 19.35% M, p = 0.024, X2 = 5.04). ACT prevalence was 83.33% for DM type 1 (85.45% F and 60% M, p = 0.143, X2 = 2.14), 26.55% for DM type 2 (27.38% F and 21.05% M, p = 0.41, X2 = 0.68), 28.41% for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (29.47% F and 10% M, p = 0.184, X2 = 1.76), and 24.78% for impaired fasting glucose tolerance (IFG) (26.85% F and 0% M, p = 0.07, X2 = 3.21). Significant differences regarding ACT prevalence were found between the group with DM type 1 and type 2 and other changes in glycemic balance (83.33% vs. 26.55%, p <0.001, X2 = 69.33 for type 2 diabetes, 83.33% vs. 28.41%, p <0.001, X2 = 55.95 for IGT, 83.33% vs. 24.78%, p <0.001, X2 = 55.01 for IFG). Conclusion: ACT has prevailed in females and in the group with type 1 diabetes due to autoimmune origin, part of the polygalndular autoimmune syndrome type III.

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European Scientific Journal (ESJ)

 

ISSN: 1857 - 7881 (Print)
ISSN: 1857 - 7431 (Online)

 

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