Placental Malaria Parasitization at Delivery: Experience at a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

  • Oweisi P.W. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria
  • John C.T. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria
  • Omietimi J.E. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria
  • Aigere E.O.S. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria
  • Allagoa D.O. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria
  • Kotingo E.L. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

Abstract

Background: In malaria endemic areas, pregnant women are constantly at risk of repeated malaria infestation which if left untreated, poses a significant threat to the health and survival of the mother and her baby. Objective: This study determined the prevalence and risk factors for placental malaria parasitaemia among parturients at the Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Nigeria. Methodology: A prospective cross-sectional analytical study of 205 parturients recruited consecutively at presentation for delivery. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. After delivery, placental blood was collected for microscopy to detect malaria parasites. Data was analysed using SPSS version 22. Results: The prevalence of placental malaria parasitaemia was 13.7%. Maternal age <25 years (P<0.001), low educational status (P = 0.03), low parity (P = 0.03), unbooked status (P < 0.001) and non-use of intermittent preventive treatment (P <0.001) were significantly associated with placental malaria parasitaemia. Receiving three or more doses of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy was by far, more protective for placental malaria than receiving 2 doses (odds ratio = 0.25). Plasmodium falciparum was the only parasite species detected. Conclusion: Malaria still ravages our obstetric population and the significant contributors include low maternal age, low educational status, low parity, unbooked status and non-use of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy. Women should be encouraged to utilize antenatal care. There should be a prompt adoption of the recent WHO recommendations regarding malaria prophylaxis in pregnancy in all obstetric units and the medication should be given as Directly Observed Therapy.

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Published
2018-03-31
How to Cite
P.W., O., C.T., J., J.E., O., E.O.S., A., D.O., A., & E.L., K. (2018). Placental Malaria Parasitization at Delivery: Experience at a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital. European Scientific Journal, ESJ, 14(9), 243. https://doi.org/10.19044/esj.2018.v14n9p243