Contribution to the Diagnostic Study of Intestinal Parasitosis, Haiti

  • Daphnee Michel Quisqueya University, Faculty of Health Sciences (FSSA), Master's Program in Public Health, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Quisqueya University, Zoonoses and Food Poisoning Research Laboratory (LAZERIA), Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Haitian Association of Women, Science and Technology (AHFST), Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Center for Planning Techniques and Applied Economics (CTPEA), Port-au-Prince, Haiti
  • Lucainson Raymond Center for Planning Techniques and Applied Economics (CTPEA), Port-au-Prince, Haiti
  • Ammcise Apply Quisqueya University, Faculty of Health Sciences (FSSA), Master's Program in Public Health, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Quisqueya University, Climate Change Research Team (ERC2), Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Haitian Association of Women, Science and Technology (AHFST), Port-au-Prince, Haiti
  • Daphenide Daphenide St Louis Quisqueya University, Faculty of Health Sciences (FSSA), Master's Program in Public Health, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Quisqueya University, Zoonoses and Food Poisoning Research Laboratory (LAZERIA), Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Haitian Association of Women, Science and Technology (AHFST), Port-au-Prince, Haiti
  • Ketty Balthazard-Accou Quisqueya University, Zoonoses and Food Poisoning Research Laboratory (LAZERIA), Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Haitian Association of Women, Science and Technology (AHFST), Port-au-Prince, Haiti
  • Max Francois Millien Quisqueya University, Zoonoses and Food Poisoning Research Laboratory (LAZERIA), Port-au-Prince, Haiti
  • Evens Emmanuel Quisqueya University, Climate Change Research Team (ERC2), Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Keywords: Intestinal parasitosis, parasitic infestation, neglected tropical diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, Fermathe Hospital

Abstract

Parasitic intestinal diseases are widespread in the world with a higher prevalence in developing countries. They are generally a serious public health problem in tropical countries. In October 2020, a cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in patients visiting Fermathe Hospital in Haiti. Data were collected on stool results with the presence of parasites and we used systematic sampling for further information regarding patients with parasitology problems. A summary field survey was also carried out in the surrounding areas with more cases recorded such as Corail, Calbasse, Fort Jacques, Center / Marché Kenscoff, Doco, and Douret for direct observations of the inventory and voluntary interviews with the residents of the area on hygiene practices. The prevalence of intestinal parasites was 31.26% and the most common species were: Endolimax nana (39.13%), followed by Blastocystis hominis (14%), Blastocystis hominis / Giardia intestinales (12.07%), Entamoeba coli (5.31%), and others like Iodamoeba butschlii, Ascaris lumbricoides or combined parasites were less than 5%. The field survey revealed a strong relationship between parasitosis and drinking water, parasitosis, and place of defecation. Although there are health centers in the area, many people use self-medication or empiric therapy. The study highlights the important causes of gastrointestinal disorders that present themselves in this hospital and confirms intestinal parasitosis as a major public health problem in Haiti.

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Published
2021-05-31
How to Cite
Michel, D., Raymond, L., Apply, A., Daphenide St Louis, D., Balthazard-Accou, K., Millien, M. F., & Emmanuel, E. (2021). Contribution to the Diagnostic Study of Intestinal Parasitosis, Haiti. European Scientific Journal, ESJ, 17(17), 64. https://doi.org/10.19044/esj.2021.v17n17p64
Section
ESJ Natural/Life/Medical Sciences