KINEMATICS OF BOARD BREAKING IN KARATE USING VIDEO ANALYSIS – A DYNAMIC MODEL OF APPLIED PHYSICS AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

N. K. Rathee, Jenny Magnes, Justin Davis

Abstract


Martial arts have fascinated the world with its fast paced actions andamazing feats. In this study the kinematics of a karate straight punch hasbeen studied through slow motion video analysis in relation to momentum,velocity, acceleration and impact of force as a function of time to enhancethe execution of the karate straight punch. It has been found that the impulsewas significantly smaller when the board is broken.From an educational perspective, this analysis will help in integrating somevalid concepts of physics in teaching mechanical concepts of movements insports. This quantitative analysis will enable the students to understand themovement technique to avoid the injuries. It will be helpful in devisingtraining schedule for karate students and in teaching them karate skills inproper manner. A person, regardless of size and strength, if trained properlyin the terms of body mechanics, kinematics, and physics of martial arts, canput out optimum performance and derive maximum benefits withoutunnecessary wastage of energy. The subjects had also completed theConcentration Grid to find out their concentration levels. The karateka whowas successful in breaking the board has been found to have a higher level ofconcentration as compared to the unsuccessful karateka, indicating that thispsychological parameter also has significant impact on the impulse leadingto board breaking karate performance.

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European Scientific Journal (ESJ)

 

ISSN: 1857 - 7881 (Print)
ISSN: 1857 - 7431 (Online)

 

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