RESILIENCE OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES TO DISASTERS: AN EXPLORATION OF PRACTICES OF KONYAK COMMUNITY, NAGALAND

  • John Paulraj Jamsetji Tata Centre for Disaster Management, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai
  • Janki Andharia Jamsetji Tata Centre for Disaster Management, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai

Abstract

With an increase in the occurrences of disasters there is growing interest in the way indigenous communities living in developing nations deal with disasters. The states’ disaster risk reduction programmes are in their nascent forms and struggle to reach rural and tribal areas. However, people have lived with disasters for centuries. This notion of resilience inherent in traditional communities depends on their belief systems and perceptions. While these perceptions may appear superstitious and irrational to the scientific community, it is worthwhile to examine how some of the cultural practices contribute to reducing disaster risks and building resilience of traditional communities. This paper explores the link between culture and tradition and its intersection with disaster management practices of the Konyak community in Nagaland. It builds on the idea that traditional communities demonstrate resilience to disasters because of their cultural beliefs, practices, and also of their understanding of the environment.

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Published
2015-06-10
How to Cite
Paulraj, J., & Andharia, J. (2015). RESILIENCE OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES TO DISASTERS: AN EXPLORATION OF PRACTICES OF KONYAK COMMUNITY, NAGALAND. European Scientific Journal, ESJ, 11(10). Retrieved from https://eujournal.org/index.php/esj/article/view/5718