The Analogical Practitioner: Relating Theory to Practice in Vocational Settings Using Problem Solutions, Causality, Design Patterns, Abstraction, and Case-Based Reasoning

  • Paul Kingsley University of Liverpool/Laureate Online Education, United Kingdom

Abstract

Universally true generalizations, from which specific conclusions can be deduced, are often unavailable to the practitioner, defined as anyone carrying out an occupation or profession. Theoretical shortcomings in the body of knowledge presented by academics can be counteracted by the practitioner using his or her knowledge of problem solutions. These can be stored as particular cases or as more generalized design patterns. They will typically contain information about cause-and-effect relationships and normative information about acceptable solutions. Use can be made of these solutions by employing reasoning by analogy and case-based reasoning. Similar problems require similar solutions. Cause-and-effect theory can be generated by practitioners using abstraction from particular cases, as an alternative to enumerative induction. The difference between this theory and that of the academic can be largely one of degree of generality. There is a continuum of cause-and-effect relationships at different levels of abstraction, which does not justify the abrupt separation of the academic and practitioner worlds, which has been encouraged by a reasonable interpretation of Bernsteins work. The study of exemplary problems in vocational education can be made more effective if it is accompanied by an examination of the actual outcomes of previously proposed solutions.

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Published
2017-03-31
How to Cite
Kingsley, P. (2017). The Analogical Practitioner: Relating Theory to Practice in Vocational Settings Using Problem Solutions, Causality, Design Patterns, Abstraction, and Case-Based Reasoning. European Scientific Journal, ESJ, 13(7), 1. https://doi.org/10.19044/esj.2017.v13n7p1